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Flush Free Niacin (inositol hexaniacinate)

.Niacinol 60 caps Tyler's preparation of high-potency inositol hexaniacinate (IHN). Due to the natural biochemical structure of IHN, niacin is released gradually into the system, thus avoiding the unpleasant skin-flush reaction and gastrointestinal symptoms which can occur with other niacin preparations. Niacinol is free of sustained-release chemical excipients and is safe and well-tolerated in high doses.

Two Capsules Provide:
Niacin (inositol hexaniacinate) 1 gram = 1000 mg
Dosage: 1 to 3 Capsules per day with meals.

Product Quantities: 60 UltraCaps
1 Bottle $19.95
Save 10% 6 Bottles $107.75

By Mayo Clinic staff

Niacin, a B vitamin, has long been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps sweep up low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, in your bloodstream. Although niacin is readily available and effective, it hasn't gotten much attention compared to other cholesterol drugs.

A lot of the attention regarding cholesterol has been focused on lowering your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol. That's still an important goal. But boosting your HDL level can be just as important as lowering your LDL cholesterol. Taking niacin — either by itself or along with other cholesterol-lowering medication — may help control your total cholesterol level.

 Niacin can raise HDL — the "good" cholesterol — by 15 to 35 percent. This makes niacin the most effective drug available for raising HDL cholesterol. While niacin's effect on HDL is of most interest, it's worth noting that niacin also decreases your LDL and triglyceride levels. High levels of LDL and triglycerides are significant risk factors for heart 

What Is It?
Also known as vitamin B. 
Three forms of niacin supplements--each with a specific therapeutic role--are commercially available: nicotinic acid (also called nicotinate), niacinamide and inositol hexaniacinate, a compound of niacin and inositol (another B-family vitamin).


Normally, the body manages to absorb enough niacin from foods to carry out basic functions, working on the cellular level to keep the digestive system, skin and nerves healthy. This vitamin is also critical to releasing energy from carbohydrates and helping to control blood-sugar levels. Interestingly, the body also synthesizes niacin from tryptophan, an amino acid found in eggs, milk and poultry.

Health Benefits
Although few people in the industrialized world are actually deficient in niacin, many may benefit from additional amounts in supplement form to help treat assorted complaints. Keep in mind that each of the three forms of niacin affects the body differently. Niacinamide has notable anti-inflammatory properties, for example, while nicotinic acid and inositol hexaniacinate affect blood lipid levels and circulation.



If You Get Too Little
A deficiency in niacin can result in pellagra, a skin disorder characterized by small patches of dry, scaly irritated skin in sunlight-exposed areas. Other symptoms include loss of appetite and strength, and digestive complaints. Severe cases can involve headache, memory loss and depression. Pellagra is now quite rare in the industrialized world.

If You Get Too Much
It's nearly impossible to get too much niacin from foods. This is not the case with supplements, however. Keep in mind that megadoses can cause serious side effects, such as abdominal cramping, nausea, and vomiting; lightheadedness; ulcers; and skin rashes, flushing or itching. Liver damage is also a risk with long-term use of niacinamide and nicotinic acid. Inositol hexaniacinate in doses higher than 2,000 mg a day may have a blood-thinning effect.

General Dosage Information
Special tips: Most multivitamins and B-complex supplements provide the RDA for niacin. Dosages adequate for treating specific ailments are typically found in individual niacin supplements, however.

--In general, niacin in the form of inositol hexaniacinate and niacinamide tends to cause fewer side effects than nicotinic acid.


Guidelines for Use
Take niacin supplements with meals or a glass of milk to prevent stomach discomfort.

Niacin acts like a drug when taken in high doses (1.5 to 6 grams a day). If you're contemplating using niacin in this dosage range, consult a doctor for supervision.

When possible, substitute inositol hexaniacinate for niacinamide and nicotinic acid. Inositol hexaniacinate is the safest form available, causing no skin flushing and posing considerably less risk of liver damage.

General Interaction
Use caution when taking large, therapeutic doses of niacin--in any form--if you're already on one of the cholesterol-lowering prescription drugs known as statins. Muscle pain and inflammation, and even kidney failure, are a risk if you mix niacin with any of the statins. Stop taking the drug and call your doctor immediately if any of the above symptoms occur.

Cautions
Check with your doctor before taking niacin if you suffer from diabetes, low blood pressure, glaucoma, gout, liver disease, ulcers or a bleeding disorder. Niacin supplements may aggravate these conditions.

Have your doctor schedule blood tests every three months to check liver function if you take any form of niacin in amounts of 1,000 mg or more daily.

Don't take timed-release niacin, an over-the-counter cholesterol drug designed specifically not to cause nicotinic acid-related skin flushing. Research indicates it may cause liver damage.

Stick to recommended doses; excessive amounts can cause serious health problems.

All information is for informational purposes only, and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. No statements have been evaluated by the FDA. We always suggest talking to your physician concerning any questions you may have about supplement/drug interactions.